https://safirsoft.com Testy Texan tells how his stock in Theranos went from $20 million to zero

Tranos investor can raise 20 times - why not sell? He did not want to hand them over, but rather summoned their defense. Here, take them, he seems to say.

It was just one of many theatrical moments Eisenman gave on a short day of martyrdom in San Jose, California. Eisenman invested about $1.2 million in the start-up, and by the time the company got into trouble in 2018, its money was gone. But as the court heard, Eisenman had plenty of monetary opportunities. His first opportunity came in 2010. When Holmes offered to pay him at least five times his initial capital to buy back his shares. In 2015, he had two more opportunities: Eisenman spoke to people at SharesPost, a private equity market, who said he might sell for $14.75, which would fetch him at least $20 million. Also in 2015, he was approached by Chris Boyce, son of Tranos' attorney and CEO David Boyce, who offered to pay $15 per share. In an interrogation, Holmes' attorney, Kevin Downey, asked Eisenman how much he could earn if he sold. Eisenman politely declined the question. "How are they related?" Asked.

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In a redirect, Jon Bostick, an associate attorney in the US Attorney's Office, asked Eisenman what he understood about the value of his stock today. "That's not an understanding, it's a conclusion. Eisenman said it was worth it. Why didn't he do it?

In search of information

Eisenman claimed that he could not make an informed decision and did not receive enough information from Holmes, CEO of Ramesh “Sunny.” Everyone else who belongs to Tranos seems part of the feeling that after the initial investment, Eisenman said he had personally received updates from Holmes for several years, but then stopped.

When he stopped About receiving personal updates, Eisenman became concerned and raised executives and the president with requests for more details. He was teasing us.” (As an eyewitness, Eisenman said it was a “complete misrepresentation.”) Joe L. Gordon knew a wealthy Tennessee politician. donor.

Continue Reading Wealthy Families, encouraged by Kissinger's attorneys, have spent more than $400 million on the Tranos Downey Program. "I agree it's a kettle," Eisenman said. "Everyone signs it." He added that it "contradicted everything I understood at this point in time" and that he felt he had no choice but to sign it. "The arms company did not sell you a weapon and did not force you to invest, right?" Downey asked. Advertising

"Sorry?" Eisenman said. "I dont understand the question." He eventually admitted that he thought the "highly speculative" part of the contract made no sense.

Eisenman's experimental conversations with defenders were the topic of the day. In another case, Judge Edward Davila asked him if he had heard Downey's question. "I heard it. But it's misleading, I'm sorry," Eisenman said. "Lawyers can ask questions and you'd be honored to answer them," Davila Eisenman reminded after recording one of the investor's comments from the record. Court ruling Over the long weekend at the end of Wednesday's hearing, Eisenman was free to return to his Texas home, provided he did not speak to anyone about the trial. But within 15 hours of leaving the courtroom, Eisenman emailed the attorney general regarding "action" on his testimony, telling him by phone that an AFBI agent had called him to drop it. However, the next day, Eisenman emailed them again (regarding travel arrangements, he said), and Bostick had to call and repeat. Defending these emails, along with his requests to Tranos executives, he's used to portraying the investor as a man who doesn't know when to lie about everything.

Why not sell?

Eisenman never answered the question of why it wasn't sold in 2015, but "greed" is a possible reason. Eisenman said he felt his stock was "more than" the highest bid he had ever received. "We have no financial information to make a reasonable decision," he said of his decision not to sell to the court.

However, despite the lack of information, it is difficult to imagine anyone blaming him for the money when the amount doubled. But he did not, and as the old saying goes, "You fatten the pigs and slaughter the pigs."

Testy Texan tells how his stock in Theranos went from $20 million to zero
testy-texan-tells-how-his-stock-in-theranos-went-from-20.html

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