https://safirsoft.com Leaked documents reveal specific rules Facebook uses for 5.8 million important people

"These people can violate our standards without any consequences."

Facebook has encountered a problem. People post entries in their accounts that have been caught in the company's automated editing system or deleted by human moderators. The problem wasn't that moderators, human or otherwise, made the mistake of removing posts. No, the problem was that the people behind these posts were famous or prominent, and the company didn't want to cause a PR problem.

So Facebook introduced a program called XCheck, which in many cases has in fact become a blacklist and over the years for celebrities, politicians, athletes, activists, journalists and even animal influencers like “Doug the Pug” to send whatever they want without violating the company’s rules. The Facebook report was published as part of The Wall Street Journal investigation. “Unlike the rest of our community, these people can violate our standards without any consequences.”

The term “few” should be relatively on Facebook — at least 5.8 million people signed up for the program every public, and many of them have significant followers. This means that a large number of influential people are allowed to post uncensored posts on Facebook and Instagram., but details the scope and mismanagement of the new XCheck. Facebook appears to be aware of the problems with XCheck, according to an excerpt from the report, but The company worked on a fix. The software product manager wrote in a report before making any changes to XCheck: “We have to balance it with business risk.” Xpheck was originally designed to reduce PR fires. When a typical user posts something that is flagged by PR algorithms To be moderated or deleted by human moderators, he can post a report on Facebook. If they didn't find their magic, they couldn't do anything else.

But once high profile users are moderated, they can share their grievances with their followers and create potential PR headaches. Or if users are politicians, they may want to further regulate the platform. Instead of behaving in the same way as other elite users, Facebook is said to allow them to post whatever they like. If a post is flagged using an algorithm, it sends it to a number of modifiers, which the Wall Street Journal says are "the best-trained, full-time staff" to review.

However, due to the growing list of users, XCheck admins were apparently unable to sync. "We are currently reviewing less than 10% of XChecked content," the document said. The situation has become so bad that elite users are said to be able to post everything from misinformation to threats of violence, revenge porn and more, but only allow posts that violate Facebook's policies. Introduce the food of thousands to millions. VIP treatment

Even in cases where the content is eventually removed, Facebook treats VIP users differently. In the documents reviewed by the Wall Street Journal, the case of Neymar, the Brazilian soccer player, has emerged. In 2019, he posted a video on his Facebook and Instagram accounts containing nude photos of a woman he accused of raping her. He claimed that he was extorting money from her.

Advertising

For ordinary users, sending "intimate, intangible images" leads to a direct response - they are immediately deleted and the person's account is deactivated. Instead, Neymar's video went on for more than a day. Ordinary psychics couldn't touch it, and 56 million people watched it when the XCheck team removed it. The video was reposted 6000 times and was harassed by many commenters. Neymar has denied the rape accusation and has not been charged. But despite posting what Facebook itself called "revenge porn", Neymar's account has not been deleted. "Profile disablement policies," said Andy Stone, a Facebook spokesperson. In the Twitter thread "We have new teams, new resources, and a process review on Facebook." The man is said to have delivered the same documents to the Securities and Exchange Commission and Congress. Adequately managed and the company reportedly intends to implement "strict" rules in the first half of this year. Meanwhile, a product manager on Facebook's bug prevention team wrote that Facebook intends to consider the "good intentions" in the eyes of high-profile users of the program and use an "innocent to prove guilt" approach.

"We do not have systems in place to do this for all integration tasks that might be required of a VIP."

Leaked documents reveal specific rules Facebook uses for 5.8 million important people
leaked-documents-reveal-specific-rules-facebook-uses-for-5.html

https://safirsoft.com According to the lawsuit, PD in Auckland ignores supervision law

According to the lawsuit, PD in Auckland ignores supervision law

A major proponent of the Auckland law in 2018 says the city is not following the rules.

In 2018, Auckland passed a law allowing citizens to u...

https://safirsoft.com He escaped from the dark web's largest statue. Now it's back

He escaped from the dark web's largest statue. Now it's back

It appears that DeSnake has given up on AlphaBay and now intends to revive it. Thai police have arrested 26-year-old administrator of the site, Alexan...
https://safirsoft.com An old coal factory mining bitcoins for a utility company

An old coal factory mining bitcoins for a utility company

Bitcoin gives new life to another sick power plant.

High Energy Consumption Bitcoin is the dirty secret of this cryptocurrency. To mine bitco...

https://safirsoft.com Bitcoin Banned In China Because It Bans All Cryptocurrency Transactions

Bitcoin Banned In China Because It Bans All Cryptocurrency Transactions

This step comes at a time when the government is seeking to limit the repercussions of the real estate collapse.

China's crackdown on cryptoc...

https://safirsoft.com Facebook owes $4.9 billion more than Fuck needs to protect Zuckerberg

Facebook owes $4.9 billion more than Fuck needs to protect Zuckerberg

Shareholders say the overpayment was a "quick cost statement".

...
https://safirsoft.com Mattis told the court that Elizabeth Holmes was responsible for Theranos.

Mattis told the court that Elizabeth Holmes was responsible for Theranos.

"I always thought we'd do it with Theranos gear," Mattis said. Retired general and former Defense Secretary James Mattis took a stand at Elizabeth Hol...