https://safirsoft.com FAA delays 5G release despite no evidence of aviation damage

Delay in US Even as 40 countries use C bands with no reports of altimeter damage

The new C band will be delayed by a month. , by January 5, in response to an FAA claim that the new service could interfere with radio altimeters used on aircraft.

Mobile operators aren't the only ones disappointed by this delay. Telecom industry watchers note that the FCC approved the use of the C-Band from 3.7 to 3.98 GHz only after analyzing allegations of interference from the airline industry and finding no evidence to support the claims. The FCC also required a 220MHz shielding band to remain unused to protect altimeters from interference. The FCC says the protection range is more than double the 100MHz buffer originally proposed by Boeing.

In addition, the current 5G band has been reported to be close to 40. US aviation officials are warning. Former Federal Communications Commission Commissioner Mike O'Reilly tweeted yesterday: "US Wireless Command and National Security are awaiting a 'resolution' to the FAA's unfounded concerns." h2>

Verizon and AT&T dominated the C-band auction in February 2021, with total winning bids totaling $45.45 billion for Verizon and $23.41 billion for AT&T. T-Mobile has spent $9.34 billion on C-band spectrum, but it primarily uses 2.5GHz frequencies to spread 5G between its bands. The FCC issued band C licenses in July 2021.

Verizon and AT&T have major plans for band C. They expect the 3.7-3.98 GHz band to amplify 5G networks with speeds above the sub-1 GHz band and coverage areas greater than Millimeter wavelength range, which does not do well with obstacles or long distances. /p>

Radio altimeters used to determine the altitude range of an aircraft from 4.2 GHz to 4.4 GHz. The adjacent C band was previously allocated to satellite services before the FCC modified it for cellular use. The range technically extends from 3.7 to 4.2 GHz, but the FCC has cellular use limited to 3.98 GHz and lower to create a 220 MHz protection band. Critic

The FCC is a specialist agency in spectrum interference, and some industry watchers say other US agencies have a history of claiming interference problems without good evidence. “Federal government processes for addressing spectrum policy have been [heavily] violated,” Harold Field, a prominent communications attorney and deputy director of consumer protection, Public Knowledge Group, wrote in a lengthy blog post last week. "Federal agencies dissatisfied with the outcome of the FCC operation respond by undermining the FCC in the press and attempting to wage proxy wars through allies in Congress. But the FAA's actions here take this behavior to new heights of irresponsibility and," Field wrote. A frequent critic of how companies treat users, he said he favors the wireless industry because "the FAA has a year to collect information about altimeters there." and start collecting data on whether 5G causes harmful interference to any model, and what steps might be taken to reduce the interference to prevent any harmful interference...Instead, the airline industry (with FAA silent support requesting every correspondence in the FCC file from the Communications Commission The federal government is preventing the activation of 5G networks in any part of the C band until the aviation industry is satisfied that there are no potential risks of harmful interference.”

In some countries that already use the C band, 5G signals in the band adjacent to Huano equipment they operate. “If intervention had been possible, we would have seen it a long time ago. However, we have added a layer of protection in the United States called protective tape,” Meredith Othel Becker, CTIA Group Chairman and CEO, wrote today. “It is hundreds of times greater than separation.” existing between radio users and other users in vital range." The FAA has not been approved. It warned of "potential adverse effects on wireless altimeters," but the bulletin acknowledged that there were no "confirmed reports of harmful interference," even In countries that allow 5G transmission above 3.98 GHz TZ. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has designated.” Several countries around the world are currently deploying wireless networks in the 3300-4200MHz band. Some countries have imposed temporary technical, regulatory, and operational cuts, including temporary limits on proximity and power, on operating wireless broadband networks In the bands between 3700 and 4200 MHz.” “There are still no confirmed reports of harmful interference for some reason. However, the international wireless operation is still being studied.” The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) noted that the United States has deployed a wireless frequency band at 3.65-3.7 GHz since 2007.

In its February 2020 decision to reinstate Assigning C FCC, he said the aerospace industry's research was unrealistic and called on the industry to do more experiments. “It is important to note that normally well-designed equipment should not be received. Any significant interference (not to mention harmful interference) is taken for granted.” About 20 months later, in a bulletin this month, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) recommended that “radio altimeter manufacturers, aircraft manufacturers, and operators provide federal authorities with specific information about design altimeter and its performance.” And the fact that they test and evaluate their devices in collaboration with federal authorities.”

A new FAA warning for the aviation sector looks to comment on C-band use of mobile bandwidth in 2017.

"The 5G C band issue has been hanging for years...why are they now looking for better standards for altimeters?" Spectrum technology and policy advisor Michael Marcus, an engineer who has worked for the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) for more than two decades, wrote on Twitter yesterday. Marcus also referred to a report from the White House Advisory Board in July 2012 that stated that "proposed methods of spectrum management take into account the transmitter and receiver characteristics of flexible spectrum sharing" because "the characteristics of the receiver are becoming more efficient and resilient." “It limits the spectrum.” In other words, receivers must be well designed to protect transmission interference across other bands of the spectrum. The FAA told the FCC in December 2020 that it “expects the cost of replacing or improving the radar altimeters will be substantial.” /r>

FAA delays 5G release despite no evidence of aviation damage
faa-delays-5g-release-despite-no-evidence-of-aviation.html

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