https://safirsoft.com According to the attorney general, Holmes submitted false pharmacy reports to managers to link Valgren

Walgrens thought "the technology worked as we were told".

Elizabeth Holmes, founder of Theranos, filed fake reports from major drug companies to Walgreens executives for relying on her company's poor blood detectors.

The bomb was questioned during questioning by the Miquelon Valley Attorney General, the former Walgreens chief financial officer. Holmes is charged with 10 counts of wiretapping and two counts of conspiracy to commit wiretapping. In part, given the strength of the reports, Walgrens traded $140 million with the $100 million startup Holmes as an "innovative cost" and $40 million in convertible notes that could be converted into equity. "It was common for Theranos to pick cherries," says the former lab worker. "Our common understanding was that the technology worked as we were told." He said his company has also spoken to doctors and other specialists at Johns Hopkins who have said Theranos is safe and useful at clinics like Walgreen. However, Walgreens executives weren't able to approve the device from the start - Tranos pulled it off before it had a chance. In an interrogation, Micklon said Walgrens had hired an outside lab to look into Tranus' results, but had not examined the device itself. "They interpreted the data they provided, rather than disconnecting the device, if they wanted to," he said. Safeway in 2010. Earlier, the jury heard the testimony of former Safeway CEO Stephen Board, who believed Theranos technology was an "attractive concept" and described Holmes as charismatic, intelligent, and decisive.

Read more Safeway has spent $367 million preparing for the unprecedented Theranos trials. Miquelon was equally optimistic about Theranos. "It was one of the most exciting companies we've seen, maybe not just in the lab, but in general," says Miquelon. In a March 2010 letter to Greg Wasson, then-CEO of Walgreens, Miquelon wrote that they "may have found the rosary" among companies that provide diagnostic tests where patients are cared for. Holmes told Walgrens executives that three drug companies — including Pfizer and Schering-Plow — made efforts to test his blood. Convince them that a review of these and other companies and experts is enough to advance the partnership. Holmes also revealed his name, noting that Oracle co-founder Larry Ellison had supported the company's technology. The company's latest report even contained a typo—"Schering Plow Research Instructions," a misspelling of the word "institute"—details Micklon told the jury he missed. Edison devices can perform nearly all standard lab tests in 15-20 minutes. "My understanding is that [the blood] is being tested on an Edison machine," Micklon told the court. "What I understood was that a basic test would be able to do 96% of the tests that are done in a lab." Miquelon said Walgreens agreed to an agreement in 2010 and has the right to terminate it at the end of the year if Theranos is not approved by the Food and Drug Administration. The startup has not been approved, but Walgreen is not. Instead, he went on to "Project Beta" in 2010 and "Project Normandy" in 2012, working on the details and asking regulatory questions. For example, the question arose about whether every Valgreen lab needs to be built or whether the main Tranos lab covers all devices. "Given the new nature of technology in the world, understanding it takes action," says Micklon.

In August 2013, just before Walgrins began testing Theranos in 40 stores in Arizona and California, Holmes called on the drug company to launch a $100 million "cost of innovation."

The following year, Walgrens' relationship with Tranos soured. The start of a blood test has canceled tens of thousands of test results after investigations by regulatory firms. In 2016, Walgreens sued Tranos for $140 million before finally agreeing to $25 million.

According to the attorney general, Holmes submitted false pharmacy reports to managers to link Valgren
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