https://safirsoft.com According to the attorney general, Elizabeth Holmes lied to investors about the drug company's reputation

The pharmacist told the court that Tranos' blood test was "bad". Apparently Elizabeth Holmes used investors.

Victoria Song was tasked with evaluating the Edison Tranos machine for her employer, Selgen, who had a small contract with the startup. What he observed indicates that the device is not ready for use in patients. He was intrigued by the promise of the Tranos machines. QPS, the gold standard for diagnostic tests, requires 2 milliliters of blood. But Tranos promised it 0.25ml, and the company claimed it could get good results in whole blood, which Song described as "very good." The problem was that only more than 14% of Theranos samples did not provide usable results compared to less than 2% in QPS. The prosecutor asked him, is this good or bad? Song replied, "It's bad."

These results, along with other data, were not a comprehensive look at Theranos. "Have you ever approved of Theranos technology?" US Attorney Robert Leach asked him. he said no". However, what Song noticed told him that the Tranos hardware still needed to work. Song sent an email to Holmes and other Theranos executives, telling them that Selgen was waiting for the next release of the Edison device. "We decided that we would prefer a smaller difference in the results," Song told the court. He said this was the last time he worked with Tranos. The startup founder faces 10 wire frauds and 2 online fraud conspiracies. The first witness was Dr. Adam Rosendorf who continued to testify on the third day in court. In questioning by Lance Wade's attorney, Rezandorf asserted that despite extensive bookings, he had signed credit reports for Edison devices for seven trials. "If you think the Edison device is inherently unreliable, do you still disagree with the Edison authentication reports?" Wade asked. I don't want to, Rosendorf said.

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Read more Elizabeth Holmes urges staff to hide Tranos lab equipment from inspectors. Rosendorf also said Holmes and Balvani were upset when the inspection revealed "slight deficiencies." At Tranos' lab prior to this examination, Holmes instructed staff to set a path for auditors to "avoid inaccessible areas." Palvani had told his staff in the lab containing Edison's machines to leave or leave while the inspectors were on site. Reisendorff said he doesn't remember seeing some of the emails in the chain, and the lab didn't hide it from the inspectors. He assured Wade that during routine lab inspections, employees would not voluntarily provide information to inspectors, but would rather wait to be questioned annually.

Pending another check, a Theranos employee told Holmes that they covered billboards "from lobby to HR" with paper "so that the inspector could not see any billboards or items on the billboards." Wade asked Rezundorf if this would protect trade secrets, and Rosandorf, in turn, asked who would stick trade secrets on the bulletin board. On November 11, 2013, Rosendorf emailed Balvani with issues that needed to be addressed before the important Walgreens launch in Arizona. Plovani replied, "As we know, we take these issues very seriously. Why didn't you bring up any problems with me when I wanted them for months?" p> A subsequent exchange of views led to Rosendorf arguing with Wade over salary, a fallout that apparently caused laughter in the courtroom. "That's why you get so much money," Wade replied. Rezndorf doesn't seem to be entertaining: "Not as much as they pay you." Laughter shows. Rezandorf received $240,000 in Theranos, and the Wall Street Journal noted that partners Wade Williams & Connolly LLP earned an average of about $1.5 million last year. Reisendorff told the court that his salary, though compared to other lab managers in the San Francisco Bay Area, was insufficient given the headaches he had on the job and subsequent legal costs. "I think I should have been getting a lot of money," he said. Judge Edward Davila dismissed the case. Out of court, CNBC obtained a set of notes Holmes wrote to himself during Theranos. Many of them are associated with starting a startup, others show his close study of Steve Jobs, the self-proclaimed idol. But it is worth noting the frank reference to Bernie Madoff, the capitalist who allowed a Ponzi scheme to steal billions of dollars from investors. "Really clever people choose, not you," Holmes wrote.

According to the attorney general, Elizabeth Holmes lied to investors about the drug company's reputation
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