https://safirsoft.com The Raspberry Pi-based device uses electromagnetic waves to detect malware
Antivirus programs usually rely on a combination of machine learning algorithms and frequently updated malware definitions to protect our computers from external threats. However, no antivirus is perfect, and sometimes it misses out on newer or deeply hidden threats. That's why researchers at the Institute for Computer Science and Random Systems are looking for new ways to identify hostile programs that don't rely on software solutions at all.
Instead, the team — made up of four members — uses electromagnetic pulses to detect malware. Even when the target is vague. Their approach is, to say the least, unconventional, but based on their initial experiences, it is also relatively meticulous.

The technology developed by the team uses a Raspberry Pi to communicate with an infected or potentially infected device. The Pi communicates with the H-field probe and oscilloscope: the former detects the magnetic waves emitted by the device and the latter films them for malware analysts.

There. Certain types of malware emit certain electromagnetic waves. Since everything seems to emit such waves these days, just setting up the system and analyzing the output of the oscilloscope was not enough. The Pi-based malware detector must be trained on all types of threats to improve detection accuracy and eliminate false positives.

https://safirsoft.com <b>Raspberry</b> <b>Pi-based</b> <b>device</b> <b>uses</b> <b>electromagnetic</b> <b>waves</b> to <b>detect</b> <b>malware</b>

< p> During the researchers' experiments, Pi was able to predict three "generic malware types" and a "benign category" (non-malicious malware that may be more annoying than anything else) with an accuracy of about 99.82%. Since their hardware is not software dependent, it works at a higher level.

This research is still in its infancy and the technology will not be widely available to the public anytime soon. However, the potential is clear: malware makers will undoubtedly find it difficult, if not impossible, to completely hide the electromagnetic traces left by their software.

We can see the future in using this technique. To feed antivirus databases and allow programs like Malwarebytes and Windows Defender to be ahead of the curve and provide better protection to their users. This would be perfect anyway - the malware makers would be nothing if they weren't redundant, so they might find a way around this system in the future.



https://safirsoft.com An unmodified Safari form can reveal your browsing history and other metadata

An unmodified Safari form can reveal your browsing history and other metadata

Why it matters: Researchers have discovered a bug in Safari 15 that could allow a website to access your recent browsing history, as well as your Goog...


https://safirsoft.com Microsoft warns of Ukrainian disk cleaner malware

Microsoft warns of Ukrainian disk cleaner malware

Over the weekend, Microsoft issued a warning about malware targeting the government and other organizations in Ukraine that erases data from damaged s...

https://safirsoft.com Crypto.com exchange hacked, but CEO downplayed its severity

Crypto.com exchange hacked, but CEO downplayed its severity

Editor’s Note: Apparently, one of the world’s largest cryptocurrencies has been hit by a security breach with around 4,600 Atrium tokens worth ove...


https://safirsoft.com Custom malware written on Windows, macOS, and Linux detected

Custom malware written on Windows, macOS, and Linux detected

Why it matters: In December 2021, the Intezer security team identified a custom malware written on a Linux web server, a leading educational instituti...