https://safirsoft.com When Science Fails: A Fake Exhibition of History's Worst Scientists العلماء

A new book lists the biggest ethical mistakes called science.

Walter Freeman was bisexual, so he could have two lobes at the same time. These two hits of snow from his kitchen drawer included in the empty space of the eyes of two different patients until he felt the thin orbital bones behind their eyes cracked. Deviating from choices back and forth was all that was needed to sever the patient's frontal lobe from his limbic system, sever his executive function and his judgment of his emotions and appetites. Yes, it was usually.

While proud to have questioned this great book, Dr. Freeman isn't even Sam Kane's worst personal opponent in his new book, Surgeon Icepick. Freeman was neither a Nazi nor a slave. Defeating this population is hard work for bad guys.

Breaking Bad

Sam Keane's Advice on Scientific Abuse. This has been touched upon in his previous books, but this book is entirely dedicated to mad scientists - monomaniacs who have turned their eyes to the prize and not received the prize, except in other cases such as pain, suffering, and morality. Sometimes, he would even give an award. Most of the time it was fame and fortune. But regardless of their motives, these people (yes, it was usually his person) would abandon whatever morals they might have had if they interfered with these research programs or whatever hypothesis they were pursuing. This book deals with why and how this is done.

One of Kian's ideas is that most mad scientists don't even have good knowledge. They want to lie about their findings - as well as torture and kill people - in order to make a case, so certainly not all of them are involved in things like surveillance groups or strict record keeping. (Although the Nazis wouldn't be anything if they weren't accurate.)

Propaganda

Each chapter deals with scholars who committed another crime and, somewhat strangely, the Nazis were recorded under oath. Almost half of German doctors were members of the Nazi Party, and they swore to never harm the body instead of some (unwanted) people.

The Nazi doctors were worried about their soldiers there, a front that might cool off, and they wanted to figure out the best way to treat hypothermia. So they kept Jews and political prisoners in ice baths until their limbs froze and then tried to revive them. Contrary to popular belief, they found that the best way was not to warm them gently by covering them with blankets, as has been done so far, but rather to warm them quickly with warm water.

This experience will never be repeated (I hope). So what do we do with the data that is the best information on how to treat hypothermia? Is its use similar to the implicit justification of experiments? Is it like infected documents that can't be used in the experiment? Or does its use as a means to torture and kill victims have a special meaning?

Aren't other Nazis

The Nazis are a very good evil? Almost everyone agrees that they were bad, and since we never did what they did, we could easily dismiss them. Here's another point Kian makes: It's tempting to condemn all the boys he presents as sick, monsters, or out of prison and no longer have to deal with them. But he noted that many non-Nazis did good deeds for the rest of their lives — not only because they were good husbands and fathers, but they actually did good deeds for humanity. John Cutler, who brought obstetricians and gynecologists to training in the United States from developing countries so they could go home and save women's lives, was one of the few doctors from the 1980s to engage in gay sex who did not demonize the AIDS crisis. He also intentionally infected Guatemalan women with sexually transmitted diseases because of an experiment he conducted for the US Public Health Service.

Propaganda

For an entity, there is another danger of classifying the Nazis and thus dismissing them as irrelevant: so we may not realize that it is easy for many people to justify their actions every step of the way until they are resolved. Intentions lead them to very bad places. Like Henry Smithman, the English naturalist in 1771. If you were an English naturalist in 1771 and wanted to collect samples from the tropics, you should go on a slave ship. These were the only ships that left. But when Smithman was in Sierra Leone, if he wanted to participate, most of the people he could really relate to won. And if he wanted to trade with them, it was the easiest African currency to help him with his business. So he sold them.

Was it all bad?

Bad, bad, bad. There was no excuse for Smithman, which was actually a repeal of the law before he left. But what about Newton? He predicted that the moon's gravity would cause the tide to rise; He sat alone in his room in Cambridge. To prove this general prediction, he needed tidal data. And again, this may mean that you have to spend on these operations. So he got his information from here.

Should the computation be interrupted because Newton obtained the data collected by the slave ship? No African may have been imprisoned at the moment, but he certainly took advantage of the powerful trading system and the evil that dominated his world. Is it the equivalent of a Nazi? Or is it equivalent to the scientists (and others) today, who when they know that building these computers exposes the land and insults the workers, and analyzes their data on the computer?

Kian has done some research on this book, and it's a book where most of it seems to have ended. This good editing is difficult. But sometimes you get too much. I didn't really need the 18th century golf skew and the many quotes from early 17th century documents to convince me he did his homework. And any tale he discovers that doesn't somehow find its way into the book is aired on his podcast, which he unabashedly associates with. Which is also a good thing, because podcasts aren't bad. If you expect these things to bother you, it's best to skip it.

An Icepick surgeon is likely to ask more questions than he answers. But this is a hallmark of good experiments - as well as good books on science and scientists.

When Science Fails: A Fake Exhibition of History's Worst Scientists العلماء
when-science-fails-a-fake-exhibition-of-history-s-worst.html

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