https://safirsoft.com Virginia connects cell phones directly to satellites

Lynk starts with sporadic text messages and expands from there.

A satellite startup says it has successfully demonstrated its ability to use regular, unchanging mobile phones to connect to satellite internet services.

Virginia-based Lynk launched its Shannon satellite into orbit three months ago as part of the Falcon 9 rocket-sharing mission. After initial testing, the company said "hundreds" of mobile phones in the US, UK and Bahamas were able to communicate with the satellite by swiping it in The sky, as if it were a virtual cell tower in space. says Charles Miller, founder and CEO of Lynk. Plan large groups of satellites to deliver broadband Internet, but all of these services into a terminal type, perhaps similar to a DirecTV satellite dish, to transmit and receive signals in orbit.

The difference with Link is that it doesn't need any terminal or even software to download, Miller says, and customer service providers like T-Mobile or Verizon are not covered in the US, like when you travel To a foreigner you are asked if you want to use local services with international roaming charges, a similar message will appear when leaving the area covered by the mobile service provider. mobile sharing.

Technical Challenges

Melker said he solved several technical issues to make everything work. One of the most important was that through the "noise" of other phones, they sent increased signals from the cell phone to the satellite. Another challenge was to compensate for the large amount of Doppler change between the satellite and the ground-mobile. Existing cellular phones and networks are configured to include bullet train speed but not orbital speed. Link engineers had to design the technology for the satellite to do this Doppler compensation in space so the phone could "see" what appeared to be a stationary tower. With one satellite, coverage is only available for a few minutes a day over several latitudes. Next year, with 10 satellites, Miller said, the goal is to cover most of the planet every few hours. Until 2023, with about 100 satellites, it will be covered every 5-20 minutes. "A total of 1,500 satellites are needed to create a continuous, real-time network," he said. "This is a technology that saves lives."

With limited bandwidth, the service initially only offered text messages — with an emphasis on potentially saving users' lives from storms, getting lost on a mountain climbing trip or at sea, Miller said, but eventually there will be some Enough satellite broadband internet service. The mobile operator sets the price for the service.

The company has so far raised $20 million, but it still has a large amount in the bank. According to Link Research, the average cell phone used on Earth today is connected to a land network only 85% of the time. Thus, about 750 million people break up at a given time. This is the market that Link intends to provide. To date, the company has reached carrier agreements with Aliv in the Bahamas and Telecel Centrafrique in the Central African Republic.

Competitor

Lynk isn't the only company working to connect landlines directly. With the satellite for the Texas-based company, AST SpaceMobile launched a small experimental satellite called BlueWalker 1 in 2019 and agreed to engineer the cell satellite. The company said the spacecraft successfully managed low-Earth orbit communication delays and Doppler effects in the cellular environment of satellites to Earth using the 4G-LTE protocol. The prototype of the AST spacecraft, BlueWalker 3, is expected to launch from Cape Canaveral, Florida, in March 2022 on the SpaceX mission. The spacecraft has an aperture of 64 square meters and is designed to communicate directly with mobile phones over standard 3GPP frequencies. Read more NASA Objects in a New Constellation Noting the Risk of a "Catastrophic Collision"

The company has reached agreements with mobile network operators, which together cover about 1.5 billion mobile subscribers. Partners in this effort are global leaders in wireless infrastructure, including Vodafone, Rakuten and American Tower.

However, AST has not yet received permission from the Federal Communications Commission to access the US market. Previously, NASA had raised concerns about the large size of the proposed satellites with an object radius of 30 meters and a much larger antenna range. This case is still pending.

Virginia connects cell phones directly to satellites
virginia-connects-cell-phones-directly-to.html

https://safirsoft.com 300-year-old tree rings confirm recent increase in rainfall

300-year-old tree rings confirm recent increase in rainfall

For at least a century, there has been no such thing as these hurricane seasons. Like many other types of weather, tropical storms and hurricanes have...
https://safirsoft.com Microplastics may cool or warm the Earth's climate

Microplastics may cool or warm the Earth's climate

Small plastic pieces circling in the sky can affect the weather. Like ash from a volcanic cloud, microplastics polluted the atmosphere and surrounded ...
https://safirsoft.com Luxo, Jr. And Mystic develops new methods to deform materials

Luxo, Jr. And Mystic develops new methods to deform materials

Two new articles highlight promising ways to change structures. 1932. Nearly ninety years later, according to a new research paper published in the Pr...
https://safirsoft.com Zooniverse wants to turn you into a planet hunter

Zooniverse wants to turn you into a planet hunter

Scientists ask people to help find the right signals. If you've ever wanted

to explore faraway worlds, now's the time. The team behind the constell...

https://safirsoft.com How SpaceX lights up a new Raptor engine in Starship without an explosion

How SpaceX lights up a new Raptor engine in Starship without an explosion

So why don't all rocket engines have giant nozzles? For the first time, the company's engineers ignited a vacuum version of the Raptor rocket engine t...
https://safirsoft.com Missile report: South Korea recently lost its orbit, Ariane 5, to record the payload

Missile report: South Korea recently lost its orbit, Ariane 5, to record the payload

"We don't see any significant positive catalyst for the stock."

Welcome to version 4.21 of the Missile Report! There's a lot of news this wee...