https://safirsoft.com Russia approves anti-satellite test, but says it's not a big test

Orbital standards do not and will not pose a threat to orbital stations. He said there is no danger to humans living in space.

"On November 15, the Russian Defense Ministry successfully conducted an experiment in which the malfunctioning Russian satellite Teslina-D has been in orbit since 1982," a statement issued on Tuesday said. "The United States is fully aware that the components emerging during testing and in terms of orbital parameters have not and will not pose a threat to orbital stations, satellites and space activities."

Launched about 24 hours after NASA, European and Russian astronauts on the International Space Station boarded their Crew Dragon and Soyuz spacecraft, fearing a potential collision with "new debris." They took refuge there for about two hours to make an emergency escape due to the wreckage.

Subsequently, US officials condemned the shooting down of a two-ton satellite at an altitude of less than 500 km. It is high enough that the debris will remain in orbit for at least the next five to ten years and may threaten many valuable assets, including the International Space Station.

United States

State Department spokesman Ned Price described the test as "reckless" and added: "This test significantly increases the risks for astronauts and astronauts on the International Space Station as well as other human spaceflight activities. ". A dangerous and irresponsible Russia endangers the long-term stability of outer space. The space. "And on Monday evening, NASA Administrator Bill Nelson also condemned the experiment." I am outraged by this irresponsible and destabilizing act. “With its long history of human spaceflight, it is inconceivable that Russia would endanger not only American and international cosmonauts on the International Space Station, but also cosmonauts. Their actions are reckless and dangerous, and the Chinese space station "NASA will continue to monitor the environment in space for the effects of waste." To reduce the possibility of a collision, astronauts closed the shutters of the station's radial units, including the Columbus, Kibo, Permanent Multi-Purpose Module, the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module, and the Quest Combined Air Lock. The gates open between the US and Russia's justified divisions. They also noted that other countries have conducted anti-satellite tests in the past, including the United States, China and India. Russia's motives? As independent observations show, it fully explains the country's decision to destroy a satellite and create a cloud of debris that could very well threaten the International Space Station.

Various theories have emerged to explain Russia's actions, but since Monday. The era of senior American officials was struggling to understand Russia's motives. The choice of this satellite in this orbit was certainly no accident. However, the decision to hit the Tselina-D satellite, also known as Cosmos 1408, may have been taken by Russian defense ministers without consulting the space station's civilian space operators.

The dark theory is that Russian President Vladimir Putin has now come to the conclusion that the Russian space industry is frustratingly behind the United States and China, and that the gap will only widen in the coming years. Because of this strategic and economic weakness, Putin estimated that Russia's best option would be to pass certain circles to these rivals. So with Monday's experiment, he's sending a message to his peers that he still has some control over space — Putin believes you can control what you can destroy.

In short, as long as the United States seems likely. The government, in coordination with other spaceflight partners, will provide some sort of response. Republican and Democratic lawmakers called the experiment unacceptable and said Russia must be held accountable. In the long term, this only raises current concerns about waste and the stability of high-traffic circuits near the ground.

Russia approves anti-satellite test, but says it's not a big test
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