https://safirsoft.com NASA may remove some astronauts from Starliner due to long delays

Astronauts assigned to Boeing flights may complete the Crew-5 SpaceX mission. Crew Dragon for future missions to the International Space Station.

These aren't final missions—they haven't yet gone through the formal approval process for the Multilateral Crew Operations Committee, which includes all international partners—but sources say new NASA astronauts who haven't yet traveled to space are leaving Boeing. Be a car because of its constant delays.

The most likely scenario is that Nicole Mann, Josh Casada, and Janet Apps are currently leading the SpaceX Crew-5 mission, which is scheduled to launch into space before August 2022. An international partner astronaut will likely join the Falcon 9 rocket , probably Japanese Koichi Wakata, for the task.

These are fundamental changes for NASA and its astronauts. The Mann has been dedicated to crew flight testing for Starliner since August 2018. This is a pivotal flight after Boeing's Starliner, Orbital Flight Test-2 or OFT-2 drone. During our mission, Cassada was tasked with the first operational flight of Starliner, a regular patrol mission to the space station called Starliner-1. Epps was added to the Starliner-1 mission a year ago. NASA spokeswoman Kyle Hering declined to confirm any information about the new missions.

Starliner lag

Butch Willmore, Michael Fink, and Sanita Williams are likely to be determined to stay in that data for the time being. the present. However, sources told Ars that NASA feels it can no longer wait to receive its junior astronauts — 2009-class Epps and 2013-class Mann and Epps — some space experiments.

During our mission in 2018, our flight took place in early 2019. However, since then, Starliner has suffered a series of setbacks. An initial unmanned test flight, OFT-1, finally landed in December 2019. However, due to software errors, the craft was nearly lost, soon after launch and shortly before it entered Earth's atmosphere. NASA did not operate the Starliner to attempt a landing on the International Space Station, the main purpose of the test flight, due to flight problems.

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This failure began a painful 20-month process for Boeing, and astronauts await their flights. NASA called the mission a "close-up view" and launched an investigation into Boeing's safety culture, and called for a redesign of Boeing's flight software. Boeing agreed to pay for its second test flight $410 million from its own resources. The company's software engineers then searched over a million lines of Starliner code for errors. Finally, they tested it much more carefully than before.

The Starliner finally landed in early August on the OFT-2 mission. However, just hours before the spacecraft's August 3 launch, more than half of the 24 valves controlling the oxidative flow of nitrogen dioxide through the spacecraft's service module failed. The launch was initially delayed by a day and then indefinitely after Boeing decided to return the Starliner to its processing nest to solve more problems. About two weeks ago, NASA's Katie Ludders, chief of human spaceflight operations, said teams of Boeing and NASA engineers and technicians were evaluating the problem through the vents. No new date has been set for the OFT-2 mission, and Levoders said it may not be announced soon. He said the mission will likely be canceled by 2022. "It's likely to happen next year, but we're still working on that schedule," he said.

Read more Problems, no launch date

Sources have confirmed that no date has been set for the next attempt to launch OFT-2, as the spacecraft valve problem has yet to be resolved. In fact, that test flight may not take place until next spring. Because there is no certainty that this test flight will be perfect, and since a thorough review of the data will be done after the flight, NASA is not entirely sure of the timing of the crew's first flight.

As we transition from this Starliner Crew test flight to the SpaceX Crew-5 mission, scheduled for earlier in August, it shows that NASA believes that the first mission of the Starliner crew before the second half of 2022 hasn't taken place. . There is no guarantee that this will happen at that time.

NASA may remove some astronauts from Starliner due to long delays
nasa-may-remove-some-astronauts-from-starliner-due-to-long.html

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