https://safirsoft.com Michael Faraday's seminal paper, photograph, digitally stored in fluorescent colors

Inexpensive dyestuffs are low in consumption and cannot be read without a special microscope. Optical discs, flash drives, and magnetic hard drives can only store digital data for decades and tend to require a lot of energy to maintain. Therefore, these methods are not ideal for long-term data storage. So researchers have sought to use molecules as alternatives, particularly for storing DNA data. However, these methods have their own challenges, including the high cost of synthesis and the speed of reading and writing

Harvard researchers have developed a data storage method based on a mixture of fluorescent paints printed on epoxy surfaces with tiny dots. The color mix encodes information at each point, which is then read under a fluorescent microscope. Scientists at Harvard University are now working to discover how to use fluorescent dyes as components for cheaper and faster information storage, according to a new article in the journal ACS Central Science. They tested their method by stocking up on a major paper by 19th century physicist Michael Faraday on electromagnetism and chemistry, along with a JPEG image of Faraday. "The cost," said Amit Nagarkar, co-author of the paper, who conducted the research as a postdoctoral fellow in Harvard's George Whitesides lab. Specialist in the laboratory of George Whiteside at Harvard University. "src=" picsbody / 2110 / 11081-1.jpg "alt=" https://safirsoft.com Original article by Michael Faraday, photo, digitally stocked in fluorescent colors "srcset=" https://cdn.arstechnica.net/wp -content / uploads / 2021/10 / dyedata1.jpg 2x "> Zoom in / Amit Nagarkar helps develop a data storage system that uses fluorescent colors while working in George Whitesides lab at Harvard Chris Snaib / Harvard Staff

There is every reason Makes you interested in using DNA to store information, as mentioned earlier, DNA contains four chemical elements - adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G) and cytosine (C) - that form a kind of code. By converting data from binary code to base code 4 and assigning it to one of four characters.More than traditional storage systems, one gram can represent approximately one billion terabytes (1 ztabytes) of data, and this is a powerful medium: stored data can be stored For long periods of time - tens of years or even kept for centuries as Kurds.For example, kib For two years, Stanford University scientists have built a 3D version of the Stanford Bunny - a popular experimental model in 3D computer graphics - that has stored printing instructions to reproduce the rabbit. Thanks to the addition of DNA-containing nanoparticles to the plastic used for 3D printing, the rabbit has about 100 kilobytes of data. But using DNA also poses significant challenges. For example, storing and retrieving data from DNA usually takes a long time depending on the desired sequence. Our ability to synthesize DNA still has a long way to go before it becomes a practical storage tool. So other scientists have explored the possibility of using non-biological polymers to store molecular data, and decipher (or read) the information stored by sequencing polymers via sequential mass spectrometry. However, the manufacture and purification of synthetic polymers is an expensive, complex and time-consuming process. src="https://safirsoft.com/picsbody/2110/11081-2.jpg" alt="https://safirsoft.com Original article by Michael Faraday, photo, digitally stored in fluorescent colors" srcset="https://cdn.arstechnica.net/wp - content / uploads / 2021/10 / dyedata2.jpg 2x "> Zoom In / Nagarkar Displays the small color particles used to store information. Chris Snape / Harvard Staff

In 2019, Whitesides Labs successfully stored information in a commercially available oligo-peptide blend, without the need for expensive and time-consuming synthesis techniques. The lab used a mass spectrometer to detect molecules based on their molecular weight to read the stored information. But there are still some issues, one of the most important is the loss of information during retrieval. Also, the read process was slow (10bits per second) and downsizing was a problem because reducing the laser point size increased the noise in the data.

So Nagargar and others decided to study molecules that could be visually distinguished from each other by molecular weight. In particular, they chose seven commercial fluorescent colors in different colors. In order to "write" the information, the team used an inkjet printer to apply mixed fluorescent dye solutions onto an epoxy layer containing reactive amino groups. The following reaction creates stable amide bonds and effectively locks the information in place.

Michael Faraday's seminal paper, photograph, digitally stored in fluorescent colors
michael-faraday-s-seminal-paper-photograph-digitally.html

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