https://safirsoft.com Genealogists say Leonardo da Vinci had 14 living relativesقارب

The youngest living relative remembers the one-year-old artist and scientist of the Renaissance.

The recently compiled Leonardo da Vinci family tree, expanded for 21 years from 1931 to the present, could provide a DNA test to confirm the bones in his da Vinci's tomb. However, the hopes of art historians to discover a genetic explanation for the brilliance of the Renaissance artist may well be condemned by scientific fact.

The Modern Da Vinci Family

Art historians Alessandro Fisucci and Agnes Sabato have researched genealogy for 690 years to form genealogical chains. They also interviewed their surviving relatives to learn more about the large modern family of the famous artist, scientist, and inventor. In the end, they live the da Vinci family from his grandfather, born in 1331, to 14 families today. Leonardo da Vinci himself had no children, and today all his relatives are descended from 22 of his half-brothers (!).

The current family played a major role in the new study. Eager to help communicate with other family members and retrieve new documents and photos, Fuzzi and Sabato wrote, "Many of them, along with their loved ones, have worked to gather and verify information." "Among them were, again and again, many office workers (one of whom was a Marine in the 1960s), a retired upholsterer, surveyor, and government employee." and music.” The oldest is now 85 and the youngest is only a year old.

To get some interesting historical insights, the artist's grandfather Michel da Vinci was a teenager when the Black Death arrived in Italy. The last of his nieces was Or his nephew, twenty times older than him, born during the outbreak of Covid-19 disease.

Who was buried in Da Vinci's tomb?

Veszusi and Sabato, especially men, were interested in da Vinci's father's lineage, The notary has been called by the public Ser Piero da Vinci, for generations to come, in part due to the fact that the male line has been traced in historical documents from the time when women lived - sometimes their entire existence is rarely recorded in official documents, but this is due in predominantly to the Y chromosome, which is the only part of the human genome that is passed directly from father to son.Checking over time, the Y chromosomes of modern Da Vinci nephews should look exactly like Michelle, Sir Piero and Leonardo himself.

This means that by comparing the chromosome DNA of recent relatives with the DNA of ancient Yum from the skeleton buried in Da Vinci's tomb, a 158-year-old mystery can be solved: Who is in da Vinci's tomb in the chapel of the era is Hubert buried? Leonardo da Vinci spent the last four years of his life in France, working as a scientist and engineer at the court of King Francis I. He lived and worked in the cobbled town of Amboise in the summer palace of the king, and when he died in 1519, he was buried in a chapel near Saint Florence, about 1,200 kilometers from the rest of his family. (By all accounts, Leonardo had little contact with his half-brothers; many of them were over a decade old, and historical documents show some differences about inheritance.)

There the great scholar decided the Renaissance 275 years or more , until the revolution came to his homeland. During the French Revolution, the Church of St. Florence was further destroyed. Napoleon Bonaparte ended after a few years. During the process, da Vinci's tomb and bones disappeared.

The workers at the site found a skeleton buried in 1863 with pieces of stone carved with the letters: "EO", "AR", "DUS" and "VINC". It reads as broken pieces of an inscription I once read "Leonardus da Vinci". The skeletal teeth looked frayed to fit da Vinci's age at the time of his death, and a silver shield carved with a portrait of King Francis I suggested an appropriate time period. Today, the skeleton resides in a mausoleum in a chapel near St Hubert, but a DNA test can help determine if it was really Leonardo.

Of course, such experiments require permission - perhaps from the church, living relatives, cultural heritage officials, or some combination of these. It is unclear if anyone would be keen on taking destroyed samples of Leonardo da Vinci's skeleton. However, it is interesting to note that skeletal ownership is now out, even if it is only a technically testable hypothesis. Most of the Leonardo family in the late Middle Ages and Renaissance were in the church of Santa Croce in Vinci, a town about 20 miles from Florence, Italy that the family named after him, and they took and buried. Subsequent generations changed the surname from "Da Vinci" to "Vinci". But the family tomb, where at least six of the artist's male relatives are buried, has been lost due to time and several renovations to the church building. This means that the bodies of Leonardo Antonio's grandfather, his uncle Francesco and his half-brother Domenico di Matteo, etc., are technically missing, although they are almost certainly under the floor of a modern church.

Vesucci, Sabato and their colleagues at the Leonardo da Vinci International DNA Project are interested in finding the graves because they hope to sample DNA from several generations of the da Vinci family. They claim to confirm that the genealogy recorded in nearly 700 years of documents corresponds to actual genetic relationships between individuals. In a newly executed radar survey, the remains of forgotten graves under the church floor Historical records indicate that Da Vinci's ancient tomb was located near the center of the building, in front of its main door. By comparing historical maps with modern plans, Vesuvius and Sabato were able to find an area of ​​the church that had once been its center, in front of the main door. And at roughly the right point, their radar scans revealed anomalies — places where radio waves are reflected differently from the surrounding soil. It is unlikely that church officials would allow excavation of the floor in front of the altar to search for relatives of Leonardo da Vinci. Exhuming several sets of remains to obtain DNA samples may require significant resources and raise serious ethical concerns. Researchers often have to show that they are asking very compelling scientific questions in order to obtain license and funding for such a project, and that the pedigree of a historical figure is probably below the norm. Nothing like The Da Vinci Code

Many of the Vezzosi and Sabato programs for Da Vinci DNA - if not sequenced - have no scientific meaning. They are mostly based on some outdated ideas about genetics, intelligence, and even race. The DNA sequencing of Leonardo da Vinci, Vesuvius, and Sabato wrote, "It provides useful elements for scientifically exploring the roots of his genius, for finding information about physical strength and possibly premature aging, dysphoria, health, possible genetic diseases and for the interpretation of specific sensory perceptions, such as superficial visual quality and synesthesia."

Some specific characteristics, such as left-handedness and some inherited health problems, may be at least partially in the da Vinci's genes to be written. Other conditions, such as synesthesia, may have a genetic basis because they run in the family, but geneticists have yet to determine this. But there are no known genetic markers for intelligence and creativity. The very perverse eugenics movement of the early 20th century believed that intelligence and morals were traits that people simply inherited from their parents, an idea that continues today. But science tells a very different story, with environmental influences mixed with input from hundreds of genes, each with little effect. "We also consider Leonardo to be an important and interesting hypothesis of genetic interaction of two different patterns, that is, of characteristics of two different groups," write Vesosi and Sabato. Some historians have suggested that da Vinci's mother Caterina may have been a slave in a café or in Constantinople, but Vesossi and Sato wondered, "Could this be the source of Leonardo's genius?"

The idea seems to be that the whole idea of ​​studying Leonardo's DNA to find out why he stained is a great example of why researchers don't just pay for blind work outside their fields. . Interdisciplinary research is important, but it works best when experts work together in different fields.

Human Evolution, 2021 DOI: 10.14673/HE2021121077 (about DOI).

Genealogists say Leonardo da Vinci had 14 living relativesقارب
genealogists-say-leonardo-da-vinci-had-14-living.html

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