https://safirsoft.com For years, a backdoor has been rooted in the project developer's popular KiwiSDR product

Users become the subject of controversy after their devices and networks are hacked. Zoom/image of the spectrum made with KiwiSDR. The Internet is mostly an entertainment base for users who make a variety of interesting gadgets with game card sized devices. In Manhattan, for example, the user can connect to the Internet so that people in, say, Madrid, Spain or Sydney, Australia can listen to AM radio broadcasts, CB radio talks or even thunderstorms in Manhattan.

On Wednesday, users learned that their devices had been equipped with a backdoor for years that allowed KiwiSDR manufacturers - and possibly others - to access their devices with office system rights. The remote manager can then make configuration changes and access data not only for KiwiSDR, but in many cases for Raspberry Pi, BeagleBone Black, or other computers to which the SDR device is connected.

Trust in Big Trouble

Tailgate banners on KiwiSDR date back to at least 2017. Recently, this section was removed in unknown circumstances. But despite the deletion, users are still shaken, because the devices act as the root of any computing device they connect to, and they can often access other devices on the same network.

“This is a major trust issue,” one of the xssfox handle users told me. "I wasn't fully aware that there was a backdoor, and it's very disappointing to see the developer add a backdoor and actively use it without consent." Xssfox Advertising said it runs two versions of KiwiSDR, one in black BeagleBone that uses a custom FPGA to launch the Pride Radio suite, allowing you to connect to radios in Gladstone, Australia and beyond. Xssfox added:

In my case, KiwiSDRs are hosted on a remote site where other radio experiments are running. they can access it. Other KiwiSDR users sometimes set it up remotely using other people/company networks or on their home network. It's kind of like a back door/security camera turned on, but on a smaller scale [and] radio amateurs only.

Software-defined radios use software to process radio signals rather than the standard hardware found in traditional radio equipment. KiwiSDR connects to a built-in computer, which in turn shares local signals with more people.

The back cover is simple enough. Multiple lines of code allow the programmer to remotely access any device by entering its URL in the browser and attaching the password to the end of the address. For this reason, the person using the backdoor can make changes to the settings not only on the radio but also, by default, on the primary computing device in which they are working. Here is a video from xssfox using the back cover of your device to root BeagleBone.

A quick video showing how the tailgate quiver works. /opt.no_console reduces this issue Thanks @the6p4c for helping me experiment :) pic.twitter.com/0xKD1NfvwL

- xssfox (xssfox) Jul 15, 2021

Here's a higher resolution image: < img src = "picsbody / 2107 / 8816-1.jpg" alt = "https://safirsoft.com For years, a backdoor was rooted in famous product developer KiwiSDR" srcset = "https://cdn. arstechnica.net/wp-content/uploads/ 2021/07/kiwisdr-admin-interface-1280x843.jpg 2x "> Zoom

"SDR... connects to the BeagleBone Linux Boom Board" HD Moore, security expert and chief technology officer of the Rumble Network Discovery Platform, tells me. "This layout is on this Linux page. Putting it at risk could put you on the user network."

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says Xssfox access to a device's background computing - and possibly other devices on the same network - occurs as long as a setting called console access is turned on by default. Turning off access requires a change in the admin interface or a configuration file that many users are not likely to make. In addition, many devices are rarely and never updated. This means that even if the developer of KiwiSDR deletes the offending code, the back cover remains on the devices and puts them at risk.

Submit software and technical documentation Like KiwiSDR developer John Seamons did not respond to an email requesting comment on this post.

The user forum was not available at the time of this post. However, screenshots here and here seem to show Simon admitted to the backdoor by 2017.

https://safirsoft.com for years, A backdoor in the popular KiwiSDR product developed by the project developerRoots> Magnification https://safirsoft.com For years, a backdoor was rooted in the project developer's popular KiwiSDR product Zoom

Another troubling aspect of the backend is that, as user engineer Mark Jsup pointed out, it communicates over HTTP and connects and displays plaintext passwords and data over the backend Anyone who can control the incoming or outgoing traffic of the device.

However, since KiwiSDR is HTTP only, it is basically sending a 'master' password which is a bit worrying "Cooking KiwiSDR does not support HTTPS and it has been said that it never does. (Dealing with certificates would also be PITA) )

- Mark Jessop (@vk5qi) Jul 14, 2021

KiwiSDR users who want to check if they have remote access to their machine can execute the command to do so

zgrep - "PWD Manager" /var / log / messages *

There is no indication that anyone has used the backdoor to perform malicious actions, but the presence of this code and its apparent use over the years to access user devices without their permission is a security breach - a nuisance. Users should check their devices and networks for signs of hacking and upgrade to version 1.461.2. It should be really paranoid, unplug your device until more details are available.

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For years, a backdoor has been rooted in the project developer's popular KiwiSDR product
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